Tag Archive: june lsat

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LSAT Exam Day: What to Bring (And What Not to Bring)

June LSAT test day is almost upon us, and you should have everything you need for the LSAT ready in advance so that you don’t end up scrambling Monday morning. Be sure to check out LSAC’s page of regulations for LSAT test day; here are some highlights of what to bring and what not to bring.

Item #1 to Bring to LSAT Test Day: Yourself. If you decide you’re not ready for the June LSAT, visit the LSAC website before midnight ET Sunday and withdraw from the LSAT to avoid an absence on your record.

Item #2 to Bring to LSAT Test Day: Your admission ticket with photo attached. You can print the ticket from LSAC’s website. The photo is a relatively new requirement for the LSAT, but you should not overlook it. LSAC is extremely picky about your photo.

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Top 5 Things You Need to Know About the Digital LSAT

After years of “will they/won’t they,” LSAC has finally decided to enter the 21st century and move away from the paper-and-pencil LSAT beginning in July 2019. We can grumble, we can complain, we can blame Gen Z, but love it or not, the LSAT digital revolution is coming. LSAC has been slowly releasing information bit by bit, and although we’ve diligently reported all the latest developments, it can still be a lot to digest at once. So, we’ve determined the top five things you need to know about the digital LSAT, regardless if you’re a seasoned LSAT vet or you’re taking the test for the first time this year.

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Logic Games and the Curve

And we’re finishing up our fantastic voyage through the June 2018 LSAT today with Logic Games and “the curve.” In many ways, these are the easiest parts of the LSAT to predict. And yet, in my experience, these are the two sections students freak out about the most. The chance of getting a completely novel game tends to worry a lot of test takers. And yet, pretty much every games section features one basic ordering game, one tiered ordering game, a grouping game of some sort, and then either a second grouping game or a game that combines ordering and grouping. People worry about whether they’re going to get a hard test or an easy test, and then if it’s an easy test, they worry that the curve will be totally unforgiving. But, not for nothing, our resident LSAT soothsayer has been nailing the curve for awhile now.

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Reading Comprehension

We’re continuing our journey through the June 2018 LSAT, machete-hacking our way through brush and thicket of the oft-treacherous Reading Comprehension section. Maybe you’ve been through this jungle safari before, having taken the June test. In that case, we trust that you’ll find this a more pleasant journey the second time; perhaps you’ll even experience fleeting pangs of nostalgia as you take in the vistas once again. Or, perhaps this is your native voyage, and you are along for the ride to glean insight into the what this jungle might look like in September, November, or beyond. Either way, make sure to wear breathable fabric — this world is only getting warmer — and to bring a lunch — but cooked foodstuffs only, you have neither the time nor energy reserves to masticate a maw-ful of raw foods. Let’s journey ahead to Reading Comp!

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A Look at the June 2018 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

Last Thursday, nothing related to the LSAT was supposed to happen. The scores for the June 2018 LSAT were supposed to be released on Friday, June 29. LSAC made a whole thing about how, instead of jerking around thousands of test takers and capriciously releasing LSAT scores sometime in the days surrounding the time they promised to release the scores (as had been the cases for pretty much every score release), they were going to release the June scores on the day they promised to release them. Which was Friday, June 29.

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Happy Grey Day to the June 2018 LSATers!

Happy Grey Day everybody! For those who aren’t familiar with this special event that occurs an ever-growing number of times per year, Grey Day is the foreboding name used for the LSAT score release date, so called because it’s the day that the green icons on your LSAC account go grey, shortly before your LSAT score is actually released.

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Are We In for Another Big Increase in LSAT Takers This Year?

LSAC tweeted last Friday that, if you combine the June and July 2018 LSAT sign-ups, there’s a 36% increase in test takers over the June 2017 exam. Which is pretty wild, especially since June 2017 saw a 20% increase over the previous year. These increases could be fairly alarming to current LSAT students, in that they might signal a particularly competitive admissions cycle.

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June 2018 Post-LSAT Carnival

With another LSAT cycle behind us, it’s time for a roundup of the very best that the internet (well, mostly LSAT takers on Reddit) have to say about the June 2018 exam! Since this is not my first time scrolling through LSAT discussion forums, I can tell you that this week, just like any post-LSAT week, is mainly made up of the most earnest of students, engaging in the post-LSAT tradition of comparing the general topics of the exam in order to deduce which of their own sections was the Experimental (and if you’re a June ’18 LSAT taker who doesn’t know what I mean about using internet forums to figure out which sections were Experimental, get online and see for yourself). So what I present below are the most unique internet discussions from the June test, which also just might make you feel better about your own exam.