Tag Archive: june lsat

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June 2015 LSAT Scores Released

Yesterday was a big day in LSAT World, as the scores for the June 2015 LSAT were released late in the day.

Here’s how the curve broke down:
-10 for a 170
-26 for a 160
-44 for a 150

This means that you could’ve missed 10 questions and gotten a 170, and so on and so forth. Also of note is the fact that it was not possible to get a 179, 175, or a 122 on this exam.

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Tips to Improve Your LSAT Study Habits (and LSAT Score)

LSAT prep season is getting in full swing. This winter, per usual, was a quiet time in the pre-law world; few people sit for the February LSAT, and there’s a lull of activity in the early months of the year. But after a busier spring of June LSAT prep, even more people are gearing up for the October. So what should you do if you’re planning on taking the test in a few months? Well, this may sound obvious, but you should study. You should study frequently, you should study well, you should study regularly. You should study.

LSAT Study Tip I: Do the work

For those of you taking an LSAT prep course, whether online or in-person, it’s not enough to just do the lessons.

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Logical Reasonings / 6.9.15

A) Want some laughs? Check out “war stories” from the June LSAT over at Top Law Schools.

B) 7 reasons you shouldn’t go to law school (unless you really, really want to be a lawyer). Vox

C) In “An Evening Student’s Guide to Law School,” Ms. JD offers some tips on surviving final exams.

D) Do you have the right mindset to start law school? If not, it’s a good thing you have a few more months (or over a year). About Education

E) This Mad Max: Fury Road-style ukelele flame thrower would have been the coolest thing I’ve ever seen… except that I just saw the character name Coma-Doof Warrior. AV Club

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June LSAT Instant Recap

You did it. You took the June LSAT. You sat down in a strange room with a bunch of strange people and finished a very strange test.

And now it’s over. Take a couple seconds to celebrate that simple fact.

Now that you’ve gotten that out of the way… How did it go? So far we’re hearing that Reading Comp and Logical Reasonings were pretty standard, but the last question of Logic Games (about magazine spreads) threw some test-takers for a loop.

Now we want to hear your thoughts.

In the comments below, let us know your feelings about today’s LSAT. How difficult did you find it? Which section(s) tripped you up? Did anything crazy happen at your testing center? Which GIF is your favorite?

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Logical Reasonings / 6.2.15

A) See Above the Law‘s law school rankings broken down by each criterion.

B) A Purdue student shares her experiences studying for the June LSAT, and what she thinks of the law school admissions process so far. The Exponent

C) A law school applicant who wanted his undergraduate grades from the 1970s changed to reflect grade inflation will not take his case to the Supreme Court. ABA Journal

D) A federal appeals court rejected a challenge to the EPA’s air pollution limits. To sum up, things that have equal judicial standing: a guy complaining about his college grades and people who don’t believe in climate change. Wall Street Journal

E) If Apple adopted this Hamburglar-esque Apple Watch mascot, I would seriously consider purchasing one. Funny or Die

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Logical Reasonings / 4.20.15

A) We gave Pen and Chisel four reasons why taking the June LSAT is a good idea.

B) This Q&A with a legal recruiter includes: Should you go to law school? Should you drop out of law school? What’s the average lawyer’s workday like? Girl’s Guide to Law School

C) What are some of the hidden benefits of wearing the same thing everyday? For one thing: closet space. Ellevate

D) Just over a year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s sentencing trial is about to begin. Here are five things to know. Wall Street Journal

E) I couldn’t even tell you why I love this Onion article so much: Mysterious Crate Arrives From London.

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Spring Courses Starting This Week!

Spring is here. The snow is melting, the swallows are returning to Capistrano and the drunks are pulling their finest greens out of the closet.

Another sure sign of spring: our first round of prep classes for the June LSAT are starting up. If you want to get studying lickety-split (that’s an Irish term, right?), check out one of these courses that start this week.

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The June LSAT Retake Study Plan

The February LSAT just happened, and you’re already thinking of June. Maybe you took the LSAT and you just know it didn’t go well. Or maybe you decided you weren’t ready to have an LSAT score, so you pulled out at the last minute. Either way, you want to make sure things go better in June. There’s plenty of time between now and then; in fact it’s a dangerous amount of time. If you put off thinking about the June LSAT, it’ll sneak up on you.

It’s therefore important that you plan out how you’ll study for your retake. Plan out a rough schedule; you can always adjust it later.

Start with a break. Get the LSAT off your mind. You’ve been studying hard, and now you need to just back off and let what you’ve done sink in.

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Law School Application Season Opens Soon: Are You Ready?

As July comes to a close, we are still a couple months away from law schools opening up the application season. Despite this, potential applicants should start working on their materials now in order to put themselves in the best position to succeed in the coming cycle. This post will specifically address two groups of applicants—first, students who took the June LSAT and are satisfied with their scores and, second, students who are planning on taking the September LSAT.

For both groups, if you haven’t done so already, sign up for the Credential Assembly Service offered through LSAC. Then, begin collecting letters of recommendation and requesting transcripts. Letters of recommendation are, obviously, contingent on recommenders and, as such, they are outside of the applicant’s control. Thus, requesting these letters early on will help make sure that there are no uncontrollable delays in your application.