Tag Archive: letters of recommendation

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Building Your Law School Application: Letters of Recommendation

For those of you who are happy with how the June LSAT went, it is time to start thinking about getting your application materials together. If you’re thinking, “Wow, I just got done studying and taking a stressful exam, the last thing I want to do is start jumping through a bunch of application hoops,” well…this is just the beginning. Strap in for three years of academic hoop-jumping, culminating in a much worse examination (excuse my negativity, bar studying is taking its toll on me).

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How to Get Letters of Recommendation

When I was an undergrad, I went to office hours with my professors a maximum of one time per semester on average. I didn’t like speaking in class, and I never stayed after to ask questions at the end of class. As you might imagine, this made it somewhat difficult to find professors who would remember me, let alone write a letter of recommendation on my behalf. If you’re in a similar position, this post is for you—I’ll be going over some ways to try to get letters of recommendation when you’re not particularly close with any of your professors.

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How Useful Are LSAC Evaluations?

Five years ago, LSAC rolled out an evaluation service. Evaluations are like letters of recommendations—those who know you judge your personal capabilities based on what they have seen of you—but in quantified form. There are questions within categories such as intellectual skill and task management, and, for each question, evaluators must select from the same answer choices: Below Average (Bottom 50%), Average (Top 50%), Good (Top 25%), Very Good (Top 10%), Excellent (Top 5%), Truly Exceptional (Top 1–2%), and Inadequate Opportunity to Judge. Evaluators also had space in each category (up to 750 characters) to make comments.

Back then, three schools required evaluations: Albany Law School, University of Detroit Mercy, and University of Montana.

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Logical Reasonings / 8.27.15

A) There’s still time to save 20% on all tutoring from Blueprint LSAT Prep – but the sale ends tomorrow. Blueprint LSAT

B) If you’re asking for letters of recommendation, here are some quick tips for your recommender. LSAT Blog

C) Although recent law school class sizes have shrunk, at least one person thinks they should be declining even more. The Wall Street Journal

D) For people in law school, here are some reasons to avoid that pizza after a long night in the library. Law School Toolbox

E) Taylor Swift sang “Smelly Cat” with Lisa Kudrow. That is all. Rolling Stone

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Your Summer Homework: Letters of Recommendation

It’s summer. School’s out – well, not forever, but at least for a few months. If you’re applying to law school, that means it’s a good time to get around to asking for some letters of recommendation.

See, professors are notoriously slow at getting these things turned around. If you were a professor and had students asking you to take unpaid time to write about how great they are, you probably wouldn’t be in any big hurry either.

So summer has a couple advantages. First, professors often have a bit less going on in the summer time, so they might be a bit more inclined to get on it and write those letters. Just look at them; it’s clearly not like they’re taking off to the beach. Second, even if the professors you ask are as slow as usual, there’s plenty of time before you need to get those applications in. It won’t screw you over.

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Logical Reasonings / 6.15.15

A) All that you ever wanted to know about undergrad and transfer GPAs. That might be an exaggeration; some of what you ever wanted to know about undergrad and transfer GPAs. U.S. News and World Report

B) When and how to ask for letters of recommendation. Prelaw Guru

C) A new partnership between four law schools is aimed at helping recent law grads get jobs and experience… by following the example of medical residencies. I can’t wait for the Scrubs spinoff. Above the Law

D) Five ways to approach your job everyday that maximize positivity and efficiency. Ms. JD

E) When a jellyfish loses a limb, it just reorganizes the rest of them. I wish I was that resilient when I lose my car keys. New York Times

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Finishing Law Applications: Get Ready to Submit!

It’s the most wonderful time of year. Not Christmas; December LSAT scores will be released soon after the New Year, and you’ll be ready to finalize your schools list and get those applications out the door. This is the time when law school applicants are tempted to hurry up and submit things, and therefore it’s also the time when most mistakes are made.

To help you avoid those killer errors, here are your final, extra steps to make sure your hard work pays off:

1. Read your personal statement. Out loud. This is how you notice errors and typos, especially those pesky extra words and the casualties of quickie cut-and-paste jobs.

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Stay Ahead on Your Law School Applications

Today’s tips come from Eileen Conner, who helps law school candidates write excellent admissions essays in her work as founder of Pen and Chisel.

If you’re taking the December LSAT, you’ve probably been spending most of your application time developing a strong study regime. Great! But even though the LSAT is a critical part of your argument for admission, it’s also a good idea to keep an eye on the other parts of your application.

What else should you do between now and the exam to make sure you’ll be ready to submit your applications as soon as you receive your scores?

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September LSAT Wrap Up: What’s Next?

Congratulations! You’ve taken the September LSAT. Now you’re probably looking to do something more productive than spend weeks worrying about your LSAT score. Here’s the good news: you have a ton of work left to do. Ideally, you will complete all the other parts of your law school applications before the September LSAT scores are released in about three weeks.

Here’s a rundown:

Get Law School Recommendation Letters

If you didn’t ask your former professors or TAs for recommendation letters, you have to get on that right away.