Tag Archive: logic games

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Mastering the Second Stage of Your LSAT Studies

A few weeks ago, we gave you an outline of what you should focus on during the first stage of your LSAT studies. Today we’re going to give you a low down on what to focus on during the second stage.

Santa’s made his list and checked it twice, and students in Blueprint LSAT’s Winter classes are getting a special gift this holiday season — the gift of starting a new family of Logical Reasoning questions! (The verdict is still out on whether this means they’ve been naughty or nice.)

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Our Logic Games and Reading Comp books are on sale, for your holiday shopping and LSAT dominating needs

Back by popular demand, we’re once again offering a sale on our amazing Logic Games and Reading Comprehension prep books! The last time we offered this sale on Amazon, these books sold like the virtual equivalents of hot cakes, so we’re running it back. From now until Monday, January 1 at 9 am PST, you can find both prep books discounted to the all-time low price of $39.00 on Amazon.

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Tricky Ordering Rules

One of the keys to unlocking the LSAT Logic Games section is to represent the rules as visually and completely as possible. Most of the time, doing so is relatively straightforward, but there are some rules that are trickier to understand and visualize. Today, we’ll talk about some tricky rules you might see in Ordering logic games and how to approach them to squeeze every last bit of information out of them.

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Mastering the First Stage of Your LSAT Studies

Now that Blueprint classes for the February LSAT are underway, you’re going to be learning a lot and it’s going to come at you quickly. So this is a good time to go over what’s most important from the first few lessons. What should you really make sure you get down, and what don’t you need to worry about too much.

Here are the things that are really important right now:

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These Spooky Logic Games Are More Trick than Treat

Halloween Week continues here at Ghost Strongly Supported (speaking of which, have you entered our costume/pumpkin-carving contest yet??) with something truly spooky — we’ve got a super special set of Logic Games for you, hot and fresh out the proverbial kitchen.

We cooked up these games ourselves at Blueprint, using real LSAT logic games as an inspiration. If you’re truly stumped, we’ve provided some quick tips below to help you find deductions, but you should attempt the games on your own before checking out those hints.

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Reading Comp and Logic Games

Yesterday, we took a detailed look at the Logical Reasoning sections on the September 2017 LSAT. We found a set of sections that had a pretty typical distribution of question types, but that leaned heavily on conditionality. Overall, they were a set a pretty mild LR section. But what about the other two sections, Reading Comp and Logic Games? Everyone said the former was crazy difficult, and the latter crazy easy. We’ll dive into those, and this exam’s curve, below.

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Should I re-do Logic Games?

There is a surprisingly broad range of opinions when it comes to the question of re-doing Logic Games. I find that many students assume their time is better spent working on material they’ve never seen before, instead of repeating games they’ve already tried. Meanwhile, some LSAT tutors advocate re-doing games as many as 10 times to glean the maximum amount of knowledge from them. I’d argue that the truth, as is often the case, lies somewhere in the middle.

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

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A Grouping Game Overview

If you’re a student in one of Blueprint’s classes, you’ve probably wrapped up grouping games recently. What makes an In and Out game different from the rest? How are stable games different from unstable games? And what was a profiling game again? Let’s recap and talk about distinguishing the different types of grouping games from each other.