Tag Archive: logical reasoning

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Mastering the Second Stage of Your LSAT Studies

A few weeks ago, we gave you an outline of what you should focus on during the first stage of your LSAT studies. Today we’re going to give you a low down on what to focus on during the second stage.

Santa’s made his list and checked it twice, and students in Blueprint LSAT’s Winter classes are getting a special gift this holiday season — the gift of starting a new family of Logical Reasoning questions! (The verdict is still out on whether this means they’ve been naughty or nice.)

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Identifying Flaws in Your Twitter Feed: A New Frontier in LSAT Preparation

Like your average Millennial, it’s hard for me to imagine a world without the entertainment and distraction of Twitter. After all, Twitter is a virtual library of prime LSAT-worthy argumentation just waiting to be deconstructed. Sure, there are the few absolutely faultless demi-gods of Twitter (I’m looking at you Ryan Reynolds), but there is also a noticeable amount of argumentation on Twitter that is rife with fallacious reasoning indistinguishable from the stimulus of your standard Flaw question.

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Learn About Prescriptive Statements, That’s Doctor’s Orders

If you want to succeed at the LSAT, you really should get to know prescriptive statements. That’s a prescriptive statement — a claim about what “should” or “ought to” be done. These kinds of claims come up a lot on the LSAT and it’s helpful to know what they mean. They also give you hints that certain other things might be going on. Let’s talk a bit about prescriptive statements.

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Mastering the First Stage of Your LSAT Studies

Now that Blueprint classes for the February LSAT are underway, you’re going to be learning a lot and it’s going to come at you quickly. So this is a good time to go over what’s most important from the first few lessons. What should you really make sure you get down, and what don’t you need to worry about too much.

Here are the things that are really important right now:

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A Look at the September 2017 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

On September 16, 2017, droves of people — those hoping to soon begin their legal tutelage at an accredited institution of jurisprudence — took by land, sea, and air to ad hoc testing centers opened by the Law School Admissions Council of Elders. At these testing centers, these legal apprentices in waiting were given a test. Their answers to this test could open pathways to a brighter legal future. A chance to matriculate to institutions at which the sharpest legal minds are forged. The exam these aspirants would take was called the September 2017 LSAT. And unless were unfortunate enough to be in central Florida; Boise, Idaho; Savannah, Georgia; or Richmond, Virginia, take this test is what they did.

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Watch out for comparative statements … it’s better than the alternative

I’m taller than the average Olympic gymnast. Does that make me tall? Likewise I’m shorter than the average NBA center. Does that make me short? The answer to both questions, of course, is no. “Taller” and “shorter” are comparative statements. They say something about my height compared to certain others, but only by comparison. “Tall” and “short” are absolute statements.

Comparative statements do not prove absolute statements. Absolute statements do not prove comparative statements. The LSAT tests the distinction between them quite often, in a few ways.

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

Logical Reasoning / 9.28.17

A. Trump sensibly (but not exactly promptly) waived the obscure World War I-era Jones Act, which will allow faster shipments of much needed resources to Puerto Rico. NY Times

B. The Supreme Court is set to hear a case about an Illinois public employee, and may strike down laws that authorize mandatory fees to public-sector unions. LA Times

C. Related? Gallup shows that GOP approval for the Supreme Court is on the rise, while Democratic approval is on the downswing. Gallup

D. Speaking of SCOTUS, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dropped some bars on sexism’s role in the 2016 election to Charlie Rose. Washington Post

E. A child wrote an adorable letter to the court handling Toys R Us’s bankruptcy proceeding. Unfortunately, the letter is completely devoid of legal analysis, and will be summarily tossed out of the cold, unfeeling federal court system. CNBC

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

June LSAT scores came out last week. When scores come out, we LSAT instructors get a chance to look at the test. It’s pretty much like Christmas morning for us, and it comes three times a year. Aren’t we lucky? I woke up early to work through the Logical Reasoning sections this morning, and here’s what I thought of that part of the test. Check this blog for analysis of the other sections in the coming days.