Tag Archive: logical reasoning

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Look for conditional statements in any of these questions …

Last week, we talked about different types of deductions that can be made using conditional statements. This week, we’ll talk about the question types in which you’re most likely to need ’em.

Logical Reasoning

You might see conditional statements in any Logical Reasoning question type, but they are particularly prevalent in a few specific types:

Logical Reasoning / 9.28.17

A. Trump sensibly (but not exactly promptly) waived the obscure World War I-era Jones Act, which will allow faster shipments of much needed resources to Puerto Rico. NY Times

B. The Supreme Court is set to hear a case about an Illinois public employee, and may strike down laws that authorize mandatory fees to public-sector unions. LA Times

C. Related? Gallup shows that GOP approval for the Supreme Court is on the rise, while Democratic approval is on the downswing. Gallup

D. Speaking of SCOTUS, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dropped some bars on sexism’s role in the 2016 election to Charlie Rose. Washington Post

E. A child wrote an adorable letter to the court handling Toys R Us’s bankruptcy proceeding. Unfortunately, the letter is completely devoid of legal analysis, and will be summarily tossed out of the cold, unfeeling federal court system. CNBC

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A Look at the June 2017 LSAT: Logical Reasoning

June LSAT scores came out last week. When scores come out, we LSAT instructors get a chance to look at the test. It’s pretty much like Christmas morning for us, and it comes three times a year. Aren’t we lucky? I woke up early to work through the Logical Reasoning sections this morning, and here’s what I thought of that part of the test. Check this blog for analysis of the other sections in the coming days.

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Your Official One-Month LSAT Study Plan

As May rolls on and spring makes its entrance (very slowly, in the case of the Northeast), we are now officially one month from the June LSAT. If that sounds scary to you, it shouldn’t—a month is actually still quite a lot of time to prepare for the LSAT, and you can improve your score pretty significantly during that time. Here’s what to do to ensure you’re making the most of it.

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Early LSAT Check-In: What Is and Isn’t Important after the First Few Lessons

Blueprint classes for the June LSAT are underway—most students are a few lessons in at this point. If you’re studying for the June LSAT, let’s talk about what should and shouldn’t be important at this point.

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Understanding causal relationships results in a better LSAT score.

Causal relationships are big on the LSAT. Failure to understand them causes problems. Causation comes up all over the place — in reading comp and in a bunch of logical reasoning questions. But causation is especially important in logical reasoning questions that ask you to strengthen or weaken arguments. A high proportion of these questions involve causation somehow.

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The December 2016 LSAT: Instant Recap

Good luck today! Check back here after the exam for information or to add what you know in the comments. We’ll be updating throughout the day.

An important note: LSAC prohibits us from publishing any big specifics from any LSAT (this includes individual questions/answers, trying to identify the experimental section, etc.). So if your comment is removed, it most likely violated some kind of rule or was close enough that we didn’t want to risk it. Here’s a pretty good guide for what’s acceptable.

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Sufficient and Necessary Assumption Questions, Demystified

Halloween may be over, but spookiness still lurks around the corner for LSAT-studiers who are just getting to sufficient and necessary assumption questions. These question types are tricky, and also appear frequently in the Logical Reasoning section, so it’s important to have a firm handle on what each type of assumption means. If all you know is that these question types are sufficient to give you a headache, read on!