Tag Archive: lsac

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This Dude Hates the LSAT So Much He Took LSAC to Court

If you’re preparing for or have taken the LSAT, I’m confident there were times during your studies that you resented the law school admissions process, LSAC, and everyone else involved that forced you to spend months of your life dedicated to another standardized test. For most of people, the resentment subsides — students resign themselves to the reality of the system, take the test, and move on.

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Which Field of Law Is Right for You? LSAC Will Tell You

The LSAC updated its site with new features to help prospective law students learn about their legal career options. I think the highlight of LSAC’s new features is easily their BuzzFeed-style quiz, where instead of revealing Which Famous Chris is Your Soulmate? or What % Millenial Are You?, LSAC claims their quiz will tell you what field of law is right for you. As an aspiring lawyer, I took the LSAC legal career quiz and I’m ready to tell you about it.

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The LSAT, Still the King of Law School Admissions

Have you heard? The LSAT is back. It was almost gone as we knew it, but now it’s emphatically here and stronger than ever.

I suppose if you’re currently neck deep in fallacies and scenarios as you study for the September exam, the LSAT is extremely here and in no need of coming back, so maybe a little context is necessary.

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The Big News Behind LSAC’s New Policy

It’s no secret that this year has shaken the Law School Admissions Council. Although there has been an increase in the number of people taking the LSAT in the last few years, the number of test takers was trending downwards for years and years, and the current amount of test takers is nowhere near the apex of the 2009-10 academic year. Plus, the slight increase in test takers hasn’t led to an increase in the number of people applying to law school, which is also of concern to LSAC. Then Harvard Law School flexed hard, and announced that it would allow applicants to apply with a GRE score, in addition to the LSAT. Harvard reasoned that the GRE was more open and accessible to potential applicants than the LSAT, which is admittedly quite restricted in the times and places you can actually take the exam.

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OMG! There Are No Open Testing Centers Near Me TELL ME WHAT TO DO

If you live in a major metropolitan area and signed up for the June LSAT recently, you may have had a nasty shock: Many test centers for the June LSAT are already full. Perhaps you had a sudden, strong urge to reach for your phone and call me, your good ol’ LSAT pal. Here’s what that conversation would look like:

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The Revenge of LSAC

We told you a few months ago about the beginning of what is now a law school admissions trend (if two counts as a trend, that is): law schools accepting the GRE in lieu of the LSAT. If you’re reading this blog, you likely know that the GRE is the standardized test those going on to graduate school — rather than a professional school, like like law school — take. It tests math and verbal skills, whereas the LSAT tests logic and argumentation.

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A Brief Rundown of the Law School Admissions Timeline

“Tick-tock,” says the applications timeline clock. “Stop ticking,” says the law school applicant.

Today’s post is a rundown of when you should be doing what when it comes to applying for law school starting in Fall of 2017. (If you’re looking to start this coming Fall and have yet to get the ball rolling, this post is also for you, because you’re too late, bucko, and it’s Fall 2017 for you, also.)