Tag Archive: lsat prep test

BPPaaron-lsat-blog-buckle-down-october-lsat-prep
/ / / / / / /

It’s Time to Buckle Down in Your October LSAT Prep

If you’re registered to take the October LSAT, yesterday was the deadline to change your LSAT test date or LSAT test center. There’s no changing anything now; you’re signed up to take the LSAT on October 6, at whatever LSAT test center you chose when you signed up. This is not a dream. This is for real.

There are nonetheless a few ways you might not end up with an October LSAT score. If you end up deciding you’re not ready, you can withdraw your LSAT registration online up until midnight EDT on the night before LSAT test day. There’s no notation on your score report if you do this.

If you simply fail to show up for the LSAT, you’ll be marked absent, and law schools will see on your score report that you were absent for the October 2012 LSAT. If some last-minute emergency comes up and keeps you from showing up, don’t worry; it’s not a huge deal.

BPPaaron-lsat-blog-march-madness-and-lsat-test-takers
/ / / / / / /

How March Madness is Like the LSAT

We’re nearing the time when March Madness bleeds into April. The NCAA men’s basketball tournament has reached the Final Four; games this Saturday and next Monday will narrow it down from Kentucky, Louisville, Ohio State and Kansas to one champion.

Meanwhile, many future law students are gearing up for some April and May madness of their own, studying for the June LSAT. Whereas one of these events is a team sport in which highly trained athletes try to send a round ball through the net, the other is an individual intellectual endeavor in which the only round things are the bubbles on the answer sheet (and the occasional weird logic game).

Nonetheless, there are more similarities between the NCAA tournament and the LSAT than you might think:

The right kind of preparation is key.

BPPcolin-lsat-blog-foodtoeat-inspired-by-the-lsat
/ / / / / /

Another Young Entrepreneur Inspired by the LSAT

For those of you who keep up on New York City’s entrepreneurial scene, you’ve probably heard of Sharma Kapur and her startup FoodToEat. The idea came to the 25-year-old Kapur when she got tired of standing in lines at food trucks. Why the frustration? Well, she was upset that she could have been using that time to study for the LSAT. Even though she did take the LSAT, she ended up giving up on law school to instead started a new online food delivery and pickup service. It’s basically like Seamless or GrubHub but with lower fees for the restaurants. Sounds pretty good. Will she be the next Sara Blakely, the law school hopeful who veered off to become a billionaire businesswoman? Only time will tell.

She only has 1,500 registered users as of now, but maybe she could get more if she went back to her roots – LSAT studiers.