Tag Archive: News

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The Fog of War Powers: Did Trump Have the Power to Authorize the Airstrike on Syria?

At the beginning of the week, it seemed like the biggest news would be the ongoing battle over whether the Senate would approve Neil Gorsuch’s appointment to the Supreme Court … aaaaand then came Thursday’s news that President Donald Trump authorized an airstrike against a Syrian air base.

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ISPs, the FCC, and the Stuff You Do on the Internet: A Rundown of Congress’ New Internet Privacy Law

Nowadays, people are willing to publicize a vast amount of private information. From locations and dates of birth to sexual orientation and relationship status, almost every aspect of a person’s life can often be found online with a few clicks. Yet, there is one area of our lives that we generally try to guard—our online search histories. I, for one, get a little nervous when someone asks to borrow my computer, just in case they open up my search history (not because there’s anything particular damning or deviant, I’m not that interesting).

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What’s the matter with Cal?

Remember the name Milo Yiannopoulos? Before some comments about pederasty caused him to fade from public view, there was a big kerfuffle on an evening when he was supposed to speak at UC Berkeley. Protestors and so-called black block anarchists took to the streets. There was chaos. Windows were smashed.

The campus called off the event for public safety reasons. Instead of speaking to a roomful of college kids, Yiannopoulos got to cry to Fox News about how so-called liberals were interfering with his right to free speech. I’m sure he was soooo disappointed.


Milo, Cal, and Trump

You may have heard that Breitbart alum and Twitter-troll-so-trolly-that-he-was-banned-from-Twitter Milo Yiannopoulos was scheduled to speak at UC Berkeley last night. You might also know that violent protestors blocked that speech by creating chaos including lighting fires. Finally, you might know that President Trump blasted out an angry tweet threatening to withhold federal funding for Cal as a result.

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Student Loan Servicer Navient Gets Smacked By The Feds

On Wednesday, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) filed suit in federal district court against Evil Corp. — er, Navient — the largest student loan servicer in the nation.

Before we get into all that evil, a little background: Navient is a spinoff of Sallie Mae — a quasi-governmental entity that holds and services student loan debt — and it’s the largest student loan servicer in the nation.

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The 2016 Campaign, A Cornucopia of LSAT Flaws

As this rabid, flea-bitten cur of a presidential election comes mercifully to an end, we should try to find something — anything! — positive to come out of it. So, here is my feeble attempt to bind up the nation’s wounds: We got to see a record-breaking amount of logical fallacies, and now there are concrete examples to think of when you’re trying to get all the flaws down for the LSAT.

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A Brief History of Women Running for President

Although we’re not at First Woman President status yet, every election since 1860 has been taken by a Republican or Democrat. The possibility of Madame President got appreciably closer last night.

Hillary Clinton is not the first or second or even tenth woman to run for president. Let’s take a look at a few of those who laid the groundwork for this moment.

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Want Your Vote to Count More? Move Next to a Prison.

There are many strange elements to the laws governing America’s prisons, which incarcerate more people (by percentage and raw number) than any other country in the world. One of the less-discussed is how those prison populations affect voting rights.

Electoral districts are drawn using the Census, which counts the prison population as residents of whichever district the prison is in.