Tag Archive: retake

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From the Vaults: To Retake or Not?

December LSAT scores are out, and that means many students are now facing a tough choice: retake the test or stick with the score you got?

The question is a perennial one, and one that we’ve tackled before here at Most Strongly Supported. According to data from LSAC, most mid-range test takers (those who scored in the 140s and 150s on their previous LSAT) increase their scores by slightly more than two points when they retake it.

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Retaking the July LSAT After the June LSAT?

As we’ve mentioned a time or two on this blog, LSAC has added a July LSAT administration this year. This is great news for people who want a little more flexibility if, for instance, they don’t think they’ll be quite ready by June but they also want to get the test out of the way before September.

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Retaking the LSAT? Here are your next steps

Imagine yourself a month after your LSAT — you’re refreshing your email for the 50th time that day, anxiously awaiting your score, and when you finally get it, those three digits don’t add up to the LSAT score you hoped for.

For some of you who recently took the February LSAT, you don’t have to imagine. Maybe you recognized going into the exam that you were underprepared. Maybe you were shocked that the score wasn’t nearly as high as your practice scores. Either way, what are you going to do about it?

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The Guide for Studying for the LSAT a Second Time

This is the guide for LSAT retakes. If you’re still wondering if you should retake, have a look at this post and this post from an actual retaker. I’ll assume you’ve got your mind made up to retake the LSAT.

0. Brush up on fundamentals

Before you do anything else, you have to brush up on your fundamental skills. You need to know how to diagram everything under the sun.

BPPalex-lsat-blog-retake
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To Retake or Not?

December LSAT scores are out, and that means many students are now facing a tough choice: retake the test or stick with the score you got?

The question is a perennial one, and one that we’ve tackled before here at Most Strongly Supported. According to data from LSAC, most mid-range test takers (those who scored in the 140s and 150s on their previous LSAT) increase their scores by slightly more than two points when they retake it.

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The Way Forward

The December LSAT was this past Saturday, which, huzzah, you’re done with studying for the dang thing. But what if you feel like you didn’t do as well as you wanted?

First of all, did you really do as poorly as you thought you did? Or are you someone who is always convinced that you did terribly after every exam (“I swear, I failed that test!”), but it always turns out that you did fine (“Never mind, I got an A.”)? In other words, are you a Chicken Little, convinced the world is going to end because you might’ve gotten a few problems wrong (which is perfectly normal, by the way)?

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Logical Reasonings / 3.24.15

A) US News & World Report thinks one reader shouldn’t take the LSAT for a third time, but your circumstances may differ.

B) This list of the country’s most expensive law schools includes five schools in the T14 and TWO SCHOOLS THAT ARE UNRANKED?!?!?! Above the Law

C) Choose a law school using ABA data and statistics (aka not rankings). Prelaw Guru

D) Taylor Swift called out the Princeton Review for misquoting her. Ya got burnt, PRev. Billboard

E) A new nonstick coating could save waste, help industry, and, most important, looks coooooool. New York Times